Chill out!

If ever I get into a dreadful episode where one part of my body will not stop ‘burning’ then I can switch off the pain for a while by applying an ice pack.

Ice can be used if you twist an ankle, if you get a bee sting, after chiropractic treatment and after some operations. Many health professionals recommend alternating ice and heat for inflammation and only applying them for short periods e.g.http://thephysiostudio.com.au/health-tips/ice-and-heat-application/ . 

An eHow article identifies whether heat or ice or both are suitable for different types of medical conditions – and quotes orthopedic surgeon Dr. Stephen H. Hochschuler that ‘ice should… not be used for patients who have rheumatoid arthritis, Raynaud’s Syndrome, cold allergic conditions, paralysis, or areas of impaired sensation’. This article also says that heat is most often used for chronic pain conditions such as arthritis. So be warned by my Disclaimer as I want to explain what has been an effective tool in reducing my pain but it is outside the above medical advice. 

It started when I did not have access to any of the electrotherapy devices I will describe in other posts. I could sit in my own special chair (which I dragged from home to many social occasions) and in my own special seating in the car to keep my pain levels low. But holidays posed excruciating problems with seating on plane flights (I would stand up when possible), in motels, restaurants and hire cars. Sitting in these would set up an unremitting burning sensation in one buttock and leg. When we decided to fly to Queensland for a family holiday I became absolutely desperate. How could I manage the pain so that I wouldn’t spoil the holiday? The thought came to me to use an ice pack so that I could numb the pain. In this way a campaign began to freeze my butt off!

The ice treatment worked so well that when I returned home I started carrying a small esky wherever I went. The esky contained several icepacks and an ice brick with a tea towel or two for wrapping up the icepack. The tea towel meant that the ice pack didn’t directly touch the skin (or else you can get an ice-pack burn!). And the more I did this, the less I experienced pain – which lines up with the one principle for reducing pain : the more pain relief you can provide the more the nervous system is damped down and the pain levels are lowered. It felt like I was helping the entire buttock area go to sleep and forget the pain. 

old styrofoam esky complete with ice pack covers

old styrofoam drink cooler complete with ice packs & covers

Ice is never going to be a complete remedy. Sometimes the pain in my butt has been too strong for the ice to control. But it is a good way to help stabilise the area and to use in conjunction with other tools. I had already noticed years ago when swimming in the surf and diving under the waves that the chilly water soothed my headache. Sometimes I will tuck an ice pack up under the base of the skull on one side or drape it round the back of  my neck and shoulders and this can mitigate a few headaches. If you’d like to try a safe alternative you could consider rubbing something such as Mentholated Ice Gel (widely available in supermarkets and pharmacies) around your neck and shoulder tops. Of course if you wake up one day and your neck is stiff and you can’t turn your head then draping a hotpack around the back of your neck is best. Don’t use ice in that situation.

As a matter of fact, heat is one of the worst things that can really ramp up the level of pain I am experiencing – such as working out in the garden for a couple of hours in high heat and humidity. I can almost guarantee that I will activate high-level pain when I have a spa (buttock-ache) or sauna (headache). One musculoskeletal specialist said that this reaction to heat is just another indication of how my myofascial pain is intertwined with my nervous system.

You probably don’t have this sensitivity to heat but you can still trial this ice treatment – but only do it for 20 mins – and track whether cold (or heat) alleviates your pain. I know that my first instinct years ago was to reach for a hot wheat pack so I wanted to mention this basic type of pain relief in case you have never tried ice.  You don’t need to adopt my  practice of constant ice packing but I can say for myself that it has never given me an adverse effect in all those years. It has actually helped me to chill out mentally too – my mind can switch off from the pain for a while.  Many is the time I have gone to bed not with a hot water bottle but with an icepack wrapped around my buttock!

NOT snug as a bug

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